Articles

Extract from the Human Rights Commission website: © Australian Human Rights Commission [modified for AS 1428.1:2009]

ISSUE 14:
Doorway circulation space

Importance of the feature

Doorway circulation space is a critical design and construction issue for people who use wheelchairs or scooters, especially for swing doors.

A person using a wheelchair has to be able to reach the handle and there has to be enough circulation space for the door swing plus the spatial area for the person in the wheelchair. Once the door is opened, of course, the person has to be able to manoeuvre through the doorway.

Extract from the Human Rights Commission website: © Australian Human Rights Commission

ISSUE 13:
Accessible WC’s

Importance of the feature

Accessible WC’s are often built and certified as meeting the technical standards, however, more often than not they fall well short of those requirements.

Extract from the Human Rights Commission website: © Australian Human Rights Commission

ISSUE 11:
Lift call buttons

Importance of the feature

Lift call buttons if located and designed in accordance with the regulations will assist many people with disabilities to confidently use a lift. Often the call buttons are difficult or impossible to use due to their size, location or lack of clear raised tactual information.

Extract from the Human Rights Commission website: © Australian Human Rights Commission

ISSUE 12:
Floor surfaces

Importance of the feature

Often floor surfaces do not meet the slip resistant requirements making them hazardous for pedestrians to walk on, particularly people with mobility disabilities. Highly polished surfaces can indicate that the slip resistance rating has not been achieved, especially when people entering a building have wet feet.

Extract from the Human Rights Commission website: © Australian Human Rights Commission

ISSUE 10:
Signage required by the
Building Code of Australia (BCA)

Importance of the feature

Most of us benefit from the availability of good and clear signage. This is particularly so for people with a vision and/or hearing impairment, people with a cognitive and/or intellectual disability and people with a brain injury. Many of the signs we find around the built environment are not easy to comprehend due to their location, type of font styles used and the colours chosen.

Lack of raised tactile and Braille in signs require people with a vision impairment to rely on others to assist them.